My great-grandmother Louise is 101 years old today. A few years ago, I asked her to write down her recipe for cheese straws. This is what she sent me. Happy birthday, Louise—keep doing your thing.

My great-grandmother Louise is 101 years old today. A few years ago, I asked her to write down her recipe for cheese straws. This is what she sent me. Happy birthday, Louise—keep doing your thing.

We’ve been thoroughly conditioned to aspire in all things stylistic to the young, sexy, reckless, and raw. But these are virtues that most of us don’t actually embody—at least for very long. At a certain age it behooves most of us to take the long view and dial in a look that gets better with time.
Good words from Will Boehlke on high-waisted trousers, sex appeal, and enduring elegance.

YES

(Source: secondhandroses)

lesliehowards:


Claude Rains by Al Moldvay, 1955. 

Peter Lorre recalled Rains’s perfectionism and his “constantly studying” the script. At one point Lorre saw the chance for a prank that might break what the cast regarded as Rains’s overly serious demeanour. A scene having nothing whatsoever to do with Casablanca was concocted and memorized by Lorre and others. “When he came in the next day and saw us rehearsing the scene,” recalled Lorre, “he was frantic. He called me aside and said, ‘Peter, something terrible has happened to me. I can’t remember a single line.’ We all broke up and he wasn’t even mad—just relieved that his memory wasn’t failing.”



Reblogging this in honor of Claude Rains’ frames, which are completely amazing.

lesliehowards:

Claude Rains by Al Moldvay, 1955.

Peter Lorre recalled Rains’s perfectionism and his “constantly studying” the script. At one point Lorre saw the chance for a prank that might break what the cast regarded as Rains’s overly serious demeanour. A scene having nothing whatsoever to do with Casablanca was concocted and memorized by Lorre and others. “When he came in the next day and saw us rehearsing the scene,” recalled Lorre, “he was frantic. He called me aside and said, ‘Peter, something terrible has happened to me. I can’t remember a single line.’ We all broke up and he wasn’t even mad—just relieved that his memory wasn’t failing.”

Reblogging this in honor of Claude Rains’ frames, which are completely amazing.

(Source: cliftonwebb)

It’s been a wild couple of weeks since I graduated college. I’ll fill you in on more details soon, I’m sure—but for now, I want to share some pictures from a very exciting accordion-buying expedition I went on this week!

For a long time, I’d been planning to buy myself a new accordion after I graduated college—a brand-new, expensive, serious accordion. My teacher recommended I visit Castiglione, a shop near Detroit, Michigan, one of the few accordion stores in the country. And relatively close at only about four hours away!

So Dempsey and I drove up there on thursday afternoon. We spent the rest of the day with some good friends and spent the night at their house. Friday morning, D and I headed a few miles further north to visit Castiglione—a bland, unassuming building housing a true accordion mecca! There were shelves and shelves of both new and used accordions, ranging from $500 to over $10,000. There were also stacks and stacks of old accordion cases in every sort of color and style imaginable. It really was a feast for the eyes.

I listened to a bunch of different things and tried a bunch of different things and ended up on this one—a Castiglione-branded Scandalli accordion, dry-tuned, with 13 treble switches and 9 bass switches. It’s heavier than my old accordion at 25 lbs., but worth it! It’s smooth.

This new accordion isn’t as ostentatious as my old one, and I was a little sad about that—but I still ended up with a lot of rhinestones. And the spectacular sound makes up for the unassuming exterior. So—I’ve finally got a really serious accordion. It’s going to take some time to get used to the extra size and extra weight, but it will be a pleasure. I’m completely thrilled to continue learning and improving with this beautiful instrument.

Nigel Ewan

Hello, I’m Nigel, a graphic designer and skilled craftsman from Columbus, Ohio. This is the place where I talk about my favorite things, including but not limited to: school, music, menswear, theology, and life. See my professional work and learn more at my website.

Follow @nigel on twitter.

copyright, etc. 2014. S. D. G.

hey, here are more things I like